Romanai

Romania is in southeast Europe and is slightly smaller than Oregon. The Carpathian Mountains divide Romania upper half from north to south and connect near the center of the country with the Transylvanian Alps, running east and west. North and west of these ranges lies the Transylvanian plateau, and to the south and east are the plains of Moldavia and Walachia. In its last 190 mi (306 km), the Danube River flows through Romania only. It enters the Black Sea in northern Dobruja, just south of the border with Ukraine

  • Visits in Bran
  • High lights
  • Itinerary
  • Photo Gallery

Visits in Bran

Bran Castle (related to Dracula) - built, abandoned, and rebuilt in the 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries, the majestic tiered pile of towers and fortifications is set on a wooded hill overlooking the town. The interior, with its winding staircases, courtyards, and hidden passages, is filled with Gothic-style medieval furnishings

High lights

A place of mythic legends and dark tales, modern day Romania impresses with its fine collection of ancient monasteries, age old churches and character-filled castles.the unexpected delights that also shine bright. Majestic mountains, forests made for hiking, a sophisticated capital brimming with architectural beauty and chic coastal resorts ensure Romania has plenty of aces up its sleeve.

Itinerary

Tour 1: BUCHAREST: 1 day tour
Visits: Parliament House, Village Museum, Atheneum (exterior), central area, University Square (know from the Revolution from 1989)

Tour 2: BRASOV - BRAN - SINAIA
* Visits in Brasov
- The Black Church is the largest Protestant church in south-eastern Europe. It is also Romania’s most celebrated Gothic building. Its name derives from the soot deposits left on its walls after the town was swept by fire in 1689. Built between 1385 and 1477, and first dedicated to the Virgin Mary, the church passed to the Lutheran faith in the 1540s. The white walls of the naves contrast starkly with the outside. The only color comes from the dozens of 15th- to 18th-century oriental carpets that hang there, testimony to Brasov’s early importance as a commercial center on the trade routes to the Ottoman Empire.

- The Orthodox church of Saint Nicholas is located in the southern Schei district of Brasov, where the Romanian population lived under Saxon domination. Built on the site of a 14th-century wooden church, the present stone church was erected in the 1400s.It was enlarged during the 16th century with money from the princes of Moldavia and Wallachia. The clock tower, dating from 1751, was built with a donation from the Empress Elisabeth of Russia. The church grounds house a small workshop where, in the 16th century, some of the earliest books of worship in Romanian were printed.
- the 15th-century town hall (now the history museum)
- the Merchant Hall with its restaurant and gift shops

* Visits in Bran
Bran Castle (related to Dracula) - built, abandoned, and rebuilt in the 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries, the majestic tiered pile of towers and fortifications is set on a wooded hill overlooking the town. The interior, with its winding staircases, courtyards, and hidden passages, is filled with Gothic-style medieval furnishings

* Visits in Sinaia
Peles Castle was the summer residence of the Romanian royal family until their final abdication in 1947. Built in the 1870s for Carol I, Romania’s first king, the castle was decorated on the instructions of his eccentric wife, Elisabeth of Wied. Its appearance is that of a German schloß complemented by elements of the Italian renaissance, German baroque, and French rococo styles, and it is flanked by Italian renaissance-style terraces.

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